introduction

In 2009, an independent survey conducted by Lancaster University concluded that:

1. We can have little confidence in the meaningfulness, reliability, and validity of several of the aviation language tests currently available for licensure.

2. Monitoring is required of the quality of language tests used in aviation to ensure they follow accepted professional standards for language tests and assessment procedures.

Are these conclusions still true today?

At the ICAEA forum in Dubrovnik in April 2017, Latitude's Henry Emery gave a presentation exploring the challenges associated with aviation language testing and ran workshop sessions exploring the possible solutions. To follow up on the presentation and workshops, we are gathering wider opinion on the state-of-the-art in aviation language testing.

As a member of the aviation English community, we value your opinion.  Please answer the questions below as honestly as you can. You do not need to give your personal details if you do not want to. All responses will be treated in the strictest of confidence.

Questionnaire 

Generally speaking, I would say the state of aviation language testing worldwide is:
Generally speaking, I would say the state of aviation language testing in the country I live/work is:
I am worried about the quality of aviation language testing.
In my country, tests of poor/unknown quality are in use.
Test service providers should publish evidence for the quality of their instruments in the public domain.
The regulator(s) I know have the expertise necessary to approve tests on the basis of evidence for test quality.
We can have little confidence in the meaningfulness, reliability, and validity of several of the aviation language tests currently available for licensure.
Monitoring is required of the quality of language tests used in aviation to ensure they follow accepted professional standards for language tests and assessment procedures.
Name
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